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Witness The Birth Of A Mineral

While investigating the effects of nucleation, whereby molecules assemble into crystalline structures, researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory trained a transmission electron microscope on high concentrations of sodium bicarbonate and calcium chloride in water to watch the process occur in real-time.

"For a decade, we’ve been studying the formation pathways of carbonates using high-powered microscopes, but we hadn’t had the tools to watch the crystals form in real time. Now we know the pathways are far more complicated than envisioned in the models established in the twentieth century."

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earthstory:

Saccocoma tenellaThis fossil is one of the most common creatures found in the Jurassic aged Solnhofen limestone, the famous deposits in Germany where the earliest feathered dinosaur fossils were located.This guy is much tinier and was a free-floating crinoid. Crinoids are some of the most common fossils found in the Paleozoic, but most of them were attached to the ocean floor. These crinoids had no stalk, no connection to the ground. They probably still were filter feeders, taking nutrition from small particles floating in the water, but scientists are still working to understand the details of their motion. Their arms curl up on death, but were most likely extended during life and used to both direct plankton in towards it mouth and maintain its position in the water.Really cool looking, not as well known fossil from one of the most famous units in the world.-JBBImage credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/worf/215445272Read more:http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00015-011-0059-zhttp://www.palass-pubs.org/palaeontology/pdf/Vol37/Pages%20121-129.pdfhttp://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mesozoic/jurassic/solnhofen.html

earthstory:

Saccocoma tenella

This fossil is one of the most common creatures found in the Jurassic aged Solnhofen limestone, the famous deposits in Germany where the earliest feathered dinosaur fossils were located.

This guy is much tinier and was a free-floating crinoid. Crinoids are some of the most common fossils found in the Paleozoic, but most of them were attached to the ocean floor. These crinoids had no stalk, no connection to the ground. They probably still were filter feeders, taking nutrition from small particles floating in the water, but scientists are still working to understand the details of their motion. Their arms curl up on death, but were most likely extended during life and used to both direct plankton in towards it mouth and maintain its position in the water.

Really cool looking, not as well known fossil from one of the most famous units in the world.

-JBB

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/worf/215445272

Read more:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00015-011-0059-z
http://www.palass-pubs.org/palaeontology/pdf/Vol37/Pages%20121-129.pdf
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mesozoic/jurassic/solnhofen.html